Ephemera related to Stanley Kubrick's Masterpiece of Modern Horror, 'The Shining'

TV advertisement created for IKEA Singapore by BBH, inspired by The Shining.

US Weekly article from October 2, 1989. This “Where Are They Now?” issue caught up with Dan Lloyd, then a 17-year-old high school senior.

US Weekly article from October 2, 1989. This “Where Are They Now?” issue caught up with Dan Lloyd, then a 17-year-old high school senior.

Prototype vinyl toys inspired by The Shining, created by Evil Corp. Not in production yet, the company has teased a potential Kickstarter campaign in the future.

Prototype vinyl toys inspired by The Shining, created by Evil Corp. Not in production yet, the company has teased a potential Kickstarter campaign in the future.

Color set of postcards from the 1950’s showing Glacier National Park’s Going-To-The-Sun Highway, which was filmed by a 2nd Unit team for the title sequence of The Shining

(credit: Mount Maxwell Radio)

The lobby of the newly re-opened and renovated Alamo Drafthouse Cinema on South Lamar in Austin, Texas pays clever homage to The Shining. A still from the film on the wall blends nearly seamlessly with a reproduction carpet on the floor.

The exterior of Durkin’s garage from The Shining was filmed on the backlot of Elstree Studios, using salt, styrofoam chips and smoke to give the illusion of a blustery winter storm.

In the background of the shot, a tall smokestack is visible. That same smokestack, as well as other Elstree Studio buildings, can be seen in the background of a behind-the-scenes shot of the Overlook Hotel facade. 

The garage set was built just behind the exterior wall of the Hedge Maze.

The scene at Durkin’s Garage, where Larry Durkin speaks to Dick Hallorann on the telephone, was subsequently removed from the film by Stanley Kubrick for The Shining’s international release.

(click to enlarge)

View of the The Shining’s Overlook Hotel facade built on the backlot of Elstree Studios.
The large grey building on the left is Stage 5, which housed the Gold Room set, as well as the Torrance family’s Boulder Apartment set.
The brick building in the mid-ground contained the Overlook’s Kitchen set, while in the far background, Stage 3 and Stage 4 can be seen, which contained the enormous Colorado Lounge set and the Hotel Lobby set.
(photo courtesy Prop Store)

View of the The Shining’s Overlook Hotel facade built on the backlot of Elstree Studios.

The large grey building on the left is Stage 5, which housed the Gold Room set, as well as the Torrance family’s Boulder Apartment set.

The brick building in the mid-ground contained the Overlook’s Kitchen set, while in the far background, Stage 3 and Stage 4 can be seen, which contained the enormous Colorado Lounge set and the Hotel Lobby set.

(photo courtesy Prop Store)

Lisa and Louise Burns, who played the Grady twins in The Shining, visit their iconic dresses at the Stanley Kubrick Exhibit at the National Museum in Krakow, Poland.

Gift set from Santa Carla Boardwalk, inspired by The Shining. Includes Room 237 T-shirt, Room 237 keyring, July 4th Ball Photo print, and an Overlook Hotel hedge maze map.

Gift set from Santa Carla Boardwalk, inspired by The Shining. Includes Room 237 T-shirt, Room 237 keyring, July 4th Ball Photo print, and an Overlook Hotel hedge maze map.

Extremely rare television commercial for the original U.S. release of The Shining in the summer of 1980.

This commercial is notable in that all of the footage used is from alternate takes not used in the finished film.

Since 2003, Stanley Kubrick’s wife, Christiane, has hosted an annual Art Fair at the Kubrick family estate, Childwickbury. This year’s event was attended by Lisa and Louise Burns, who played the Grady twins in The Shining. In the top photo, they pose with Jan Harlan, Kubrick’s brother-in-law and The Shining’s Executive Producer. In the bottom photo, they pose with Douglas Milsome, who was a camera assistant on The Shining, and later went on to be Director of Photography on Full Metal Jacket.

(photos courtesy Howard Berry)

Frame from an unused take from The Shining. This alternate take of Wendy climbing the stairs of the Staff Wing was used in an American television commercial advertising The Shining upon its initial release.

The shot is interesting in that it features Wendy’s shadow with an outstretched, claw-like hand pose that is reminiscent of a similar shot in F.W. Murnau’s classic 1922 horror film, Nosferatu.

Stanley Kubrick spoke about how he deliberately wanted to avoid the iconography of traditional gothic horror film in his design of the Overlook Hotel sets. Yet, during the climax of The Shining, he seems to readily embrace classic horror film images in shots like this as well as the later scene where Wendy discovers the cobwebbed skeletons in the hotel lobby.

Call Sheet from the production of The Shining, dated July 27th, 1978.

The call sheet indicates the shooting of one of the deleted scrapbook scenes, as well as rehearsal with Lisa and Louise Burns for their two scenes in the film.

(click to enlarge)

Frame from an unused take from The Shining. This alternate take of Jack Nicholson rising into frame after murdering Dick Hallorann was used in an American television spot for The Shining upon its initial release.
A British version of the television spot also exists, and is nearly identical to the U.S. version with the exception of two shots.

Frame from an unused take from The Shining. This alternate take of Jack Nicholson rising into frame after murdering Dick Hallorann was used in an American television spot for The Shining upon its initial release.

A British version of the television spot also exists, and is nearly identical to the U.S. version with the exception of two shots.