Ephemera related to Stanley Kubrick's Masterpiece of Modern Horror, 'The Shining'

Prop scrapbook from The Shining.

The scrapbook is filled with yellowed newspaper clippings chronicling sordid events from the Overlook Hotel’s past, as well as violent crimes in the Colorado area.

One page bears the handwritten phrase: “And they took his balls with them” - a line paraphrased from Stephen King’s novel.

Many of the articles in the scrapbook were written by journalist Alexander Walker. Walker wrote for The Evening Standard, and was also a friend of Kubrick’s. Kubrick gave Walker copies of the Rocky Mountain News and other local Colorado newspapers on microfilm, along with a microfilm reader, and had Walker study the language and details of real articles so he could compose fictitious articles for the scrapbook.

This scrapbook figures prominently in the novel of The Shining, though it appears very little in the film. A number of sequences were shot with the scrapbook, including a scene where Jack finds it mysteriously sitting on his writing table, and a later scene where Jack shows the scrapbook to Wendy. Both scenes were deleted from the finished film.

Original scrapbook stored in the Stanley Kubrick Archive in London. 

T-Shirt inspired by Danny Torrance’s Apollo 11 sweater in The Shining. Available from REDBUBBLE.

T-Shirt inspired by Danny Torrance’s Apollo 11 sweater in The Shining. Available from REDBUBBLE.

Original sweater worn by actor Danny Lloyd during production of The Shining

Although many props and costumes from The Shining ended up as part of the Stanley Kubrick Archive in London, this sweater, as well as many other props, costumes and furniture pieces, were sold to crew members after completion of production.

Danny’s iconic “Apollo 11” sweater was originally purchased by Assistant Editor Gill Smith, who bought it for her nephew. After he grew out of it, the sweater was returned to her, and it remained in her possession for the next thirty years.

The sweater is now in the personal collection of The Caretaker.

A page from Stanley Kubrick’s pre-production notebook for The Shining.
Kubrick’s handwritten note says:

Danny Explaining Tony
Sometimes Tony made things happen to him. He made real things go away and he makes me see things that aren’t there.

A page from Stanley Kubrick’s pre-production notebook for The Shining.

Kubrick’s handwritten note says:

Danny Explaining Tony

Sometimes Tony made things happen to him. He made real things go away and he makes me see things that aren’t there.

Polaroid images of actress Shelley Duvall shot by Continuity Supervisor June Randall during production of The Shining. These black-and-white photos were shot throughout filming to notate positions of props, set dressing, and states of costumes.

Polaroid images of actress Shelley Duvall shot by Continuity Supervisor June Randall during production of The Shining. These black-and-white photos were shot throughout filming to notate positions of props, set dressing, and states of costumes.

A page from Stanley Kubrick’s pre-production notebook for The Shining.
Kubrick’s handwritten note says:

Danny Vision I
Sees blizzard. ”To deep
signs
Wendy’s room.  J breaking door
Redrum
snow swirling in a broken window
take your medicine
boom boom
hand over bathtub (217?)
danny crouched in a hallway
The shape with the mallet
Tiny red eyes glow in the dark
All this will be much clearer visually and should probably not be so complete!?

A page from Stanley Kubrick’s pre-production notebook for The Shining.

Kubrick’s handwritten note says:

Danny Vision I

Sees blizzard. ”To deep

signs

Wendy’s room.  J breaking door

Redrum

snow swirling in a broken window

take your medicine

boom boom

hand over bathtub (217?)

danny crouched in a hallway

The shape with the mallet

Tiny red eyes glow in the dark

All this will be much clearer visually and should probably not be so complete!?

Director Stanley Kubrick sets up a shot of the Hedge Maze model on the Lobby set of The Shining.

Polaroids shot by Continuity Supervisor June Randall during production of The Shining, including images of actors Norman Gay, Shelley Duvall, and Scatman Crothers. These black-and-white photos were shot throughout filming to notate positions of props, set dressing, and states of costumes.

Polaroids shot by Continuity Supervisor June Randall during production of The Shining, including images of actors Norman Gay, Shelley Duvall, and Scatman Crothers. These black-and-white photos were shot throughout filming to notate positions of props, set dressing, and states of costumes.

A page from Stanley Kubrick’s pre-production notebook for The Shining.
Kubrick’s handwritten note says:

Start
It is more convenient not to have Jack have to give his history to the psychiatrist — easier for Wendy to do it alone.
But -  the film starts better with Jack at the hotel.
Try to make it work!

A page from Stanley Kubrick’s pre-production notebook for The Shining.

Kubrick’s handwritten note says:

Start

It is more convenient not to have Jack have to give his history to the psychiatrist — easier for Wendy to do it alone.

But -  the film starts better with Jack at the hotel.

Try to make it work!

Director Stanley Kubrick on the daytime exterior Hedge Maze set of The Shining atMGM-British Studios, flanked by Director of Photography John Alcott, Focus Assistant Douglas Milsome, and an unidentified crew member.

Director Stanley Kubrick on the daytime exterior Hedge Maze set of The Shining atMGM-British Studios, flanked by Director of Photography John Alcott, Focus Assistant Douglas Milsome, and an unidentified crew member.

Director Stanley Kubrick lines up a shot of actors Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining, as Director of Photography John Alcott and Camera Operator Kelvin Pike look on.

"Chapter Forty-Three: Drinks on the House" from Stanley Kubrick’s copy of Stephen King’s pre-publication manuscript for The Shining. Kubrick’s notations can be seen throughout, handwritten in red and green. He has underlined ideas which interest him, as well as speculated about how to potentially visualize various passages. At one point Kubrick writes, “This could be like the Trip sequence in 2001”.

(click images to enlarge)