Ephemera related to Stanley Kubrick's Masterpiece of Modern Horror, 'The Shining'
This image of actor Jack Nicholson in the Hedge Maze appears to be a still from The Shining, but it’s not; it cannot be matched to any frame in the finished film. It’s either from an unused take, or is a still taken on the set. Its source remains unknown.

This image of actor Jack Nicholson in the Hedge Maze appears to be a still from The Shining, but it’s not; it cannot be matched to any frame in the finished film. It’s either from an unused take, or is a still taken on the set. Its source remains unknown.

Director Stanley Kubrick and actor Jack Nicholson on the Lobby set of The Shining.

Director Stanley Kubrick and actor Jack Nicholson on the Lobby set of The Shining.

Steadicam Operator Garrett Brown, Stanley Kubrick and Camera Assistant Douglas Milsome on the Lobby set of The Shining.

Steadicam Operator Garrett Brown, Stanley Kubrick and Camera Assistant Douglas Milsome on the Lobby set of The Shining.

The MONDO 237 Collection, which includes a knit sweater, knit cardigan, knit scarf, knit ski mask, a door mat, and an area rug, all in the iconic pattern of the carpet outside room 237 in The Shining.

Available for pre-order now; shipping in August.

Actor Jack Nicholson on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.

Standing near the camera is Stanley Kubrick’s assistant Leon Vitali.

In the foreground, the video assist system can be seen. The Shining was one of the first productions to make use of on-set video playback for immediate review of what was being shot.

(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Actor Jack Nicholson on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.

Standing near the camera is Stanley Kubrick’s assistant Leon Vitali.

In the foreground, the video assist system can be seen. The Shining was one of the first productions to make use of on-set video playback for immediate review of what was being shot.

(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Actor Jack Nicholson and Continuity Supervisor June Randall on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.
(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Actor Jack Nicholson and Continuity Supervisor June Randall on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.

(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Actor Scatman Crothers on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.
(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was actor Jack Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Actor Scatman Crothers on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.

(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was actor Jack Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Set of lobby cards from the French theatrical release of The Shining.

None of these images are taken from the finished film. They are all frames from alternate, unused takes.

In Vivian Kubrick’s documentary on the making of The Shining, several crew members can be seen wearing a black sweater with “The Shining" in red letters, and a white hawk hovering above the text. The hawk is a nod to Stanley Kubrick’s production company, "Hawk Films Ltd."

These custom sweaters were given as gifts by actor Jack Nicholson to everyone on the crew during the production. 

Cover art for a fictitious Criterion release of The Shining.
Artist: Gary E. Irwin

Cover art for a fictitious Criterion release of The Shining.

Artist: Gary E. Irwin

Syndicated newspaper column written about three weeks after The Shining opened in the U.S.
Like most of Stanley Kubrick’s films, the initial critical reaction was very mixed. While the film had its proponents, most of the reviews derided the film for being banal, slow, and too loosely adapted from Stephen King’s novel.
While opinions still vary on the film, and debate still rages about the relative merits of the book versus the film, The Shining has cemented a place for itself among the classics of modern cinema, and is still being talked about nearly thirty-five years after its release.

Syndicated newspaper column written about three weeks after The Shining opened in the U.S.

Like most of Stanley Kubrick’s films, the initial critical reaction was very mixed. While the film had its proponents, most of the reviews derided the film for being banal, slow, and too loosely adapted from Stephen King’s novel.

While opinions still vary on the film, and debate still rages about the relative merits of the book versus the film, The Shining has cemented a place for itself among the classics of modern cinema, and is still being talked about nearly thirty-five years after its release.

Winter coat wardrobe from The Shining, worn by actor Scatman Crothers during the shots where he lies dead in a pool of blood.

The coat was sold to a crew member after production. He took it home to his mother, who washed out the stage blood and sewed up the gash. He wore it for a number of years before offering it up as a piece of movie memorabilia.

The coat is currently in the collection of The Caretaker.