Ephemera related to Stanley Kubrick's Masterpiece of Modern Horror, 'The Shining'
Actors Danny Lloyd and Shelley Duvall on the exterior Overlook Hotel set of The Shining on the backlot at Elstree Studios.

Actors Danny Lloyd and Shelley Duvall on the exterior Overlook Hotel set of The Shining on the backlot at Elstree Studios.

Japanese one-sheet poster for The Shining.

Japanese one-sheet poster for The Shining.

Steadicam inventor Garrett Brown takes actor Danny Lloyd for a ride on his Steadicam just outside The Shining’s Hedge Maze set on the backlot at MGM-British Studios. Brown discovered that Danny was about the same weight as the camera, so he would give the boy rides in a makeshift swing hanging from the device.

Steadicam inventor Garrett Brown takes actor Danny Lloyd for a ride on his Steadicam just outside The Shining’s Hedge Maze set on the backlot at MGM-British Studios. Brown discovered that Danny was about the same weight as the camera, so he would give the boy rides in a makeshift swing hanging from the device.

The Shining billboard outside the Whiskey a Go Go club, Los Angeles, 1980.

The Shining billboard outside the Whiskey a Go Go club, Los Angeles, 1980.

Actor Jack Nicholson on the Caretaker Apartment set of The Shining.

Actor Jack Nicholson on the Caretaker Apartment set of The Shining.

"Overlook Hotel" socks from Sockaholic, inspired by The Shining

"Overlook Hotel" socks from Sockaholic, inspired by The Shining

At the beginning of The Shining, when Jack calls Wendy to tell her he got the job as winter caretaker of the Overlook, she sits in front of a painting of a woman holding a dog. The painting is titled “Woman and Terrier” (1963) by Canadian artist Alex Colville.

Colville’s paintings are often described as having a subtly unsettling quality, which is perhaps why Kubrick chose to feature them in The Shining.

Colville died in 2013 at the age of 92. After his passing, his son, Graham, remarked:

“I must say, I (felt) slight surprise when I saw Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining and I suddenly realized my father’s paintings were in the background in numerous scenes. They were implanted in that film as almost subliminal messages.“

Another of Colville’s paintings can be seen in the same Boulder apartment, and yet another can be seen at the Overlook, near the end of the film. A fourth hangs in Room 237.

These continuity Polaroids offer a glimpse into an unused scene from The Shining.

In the finished film, the scene of Wendy and Danny exploring the hedge maze is intercut with shots of Jack wandering the hotel, bored and suffering from writer’s block. As originally filmed, however, Jack then wanders to the balcony overlooking the Colorado Lounge, and glances down to his writing table to see something that hadn’t been there previously — a large scrapbook. Jack’s typewriter, paper, cigarettes, pens, etc. have been mysteriously arranged in a quasi-Native American design on the floor leading to the table and the scrapbook.

Jack then goes down to investigate and finds that the scrapbook is full of newspaper clippings from the Overlook Hotel’s lurid past. He becomes entranced with it.

The scrapbook figured in several other deleted scenes, and provided the original inspiration for Jack to finally begin writing. Most of the scenes with the scrapbook have been omitted in the final film, though there are still some lingering shots where the scrapbook lies on Jack’s writing table, unexplained.

In earlier drafts of the screenplay, the final shot of the movie is a long slow camera move towards the open scrapbook sitting upon the table.The camera continues to track forward until it finds the vintage ballroom party photo with Jack smiling out from it. When Kubrick decided to excise the scrapbook element from the story, he presumably repurposed that same idea by tracking across the lobby and finding the same framed photo on the wall.

Continuity Polaroid of Stanley Kubrick and Jack Nicholson on the Pantry set of The Shining.

Continuity Polaroid of Stanley Kubrick and Jack Nicholson on the Pantry set of The Shining.

Near the end of The Shining, as Wendy staggers around the hotel looking for Danny, she passes a painting of a cow reclining in a field, seemingly staring at the moon. The painting is titled “Moon and Cow” (1963) by Canadian artist Alex Colville.

Colville’s paintings are often described as having a subtly unsettling quality, which is perhaps why Kubrick chose to feature them in The Shining.

Colville died in 2013 at the age of 92. After his passing, his son, Graham, remarked:

“I must say, I (felt) slight surprise when I saw Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining and I suddenly realized my father’s paintings were in the background in numerous scenes. They were implanted in that film as almost subliminal messages.“

Two other Colville paintings can be seen at the beginning of the film hanging in the family’s Boulder apartment, and yet another can be seen hanging in Room 237.

Director Stanley Kubrick hugs his daughter, Vivian, at their home, Abbots Mead, during the filming of The Shining. Vivian later wrote the score for Full Metal Jacket, using the pseudonym “Abigail Mead”, a play on the name of her childhood home.
The Kubrick family home was only 1-1/2 miles from Elstree Studios, where The Shining was filmed.

Director Stanley Kubrick hugs his daughter, Vivian, at their home, Abbots Mead, during the filming of The Shining. Vivian later wrote the score for Full Metal Jacket, using the pseudonym “Abigail Mead”, a play on the name of her childhood home.

The Kubrick family home was only 1-1/2 miles from Elstree Studios, where The Shining was filmed.

Twice in The Shining, Danny is seen watching watching cartoons on television: at the beginning of the movie during his first scene at the Boulder, Colorado apartment, and then much later, while in a catatonic state following his assault in Room 237.

The soundtrack Kubrick used was comprised of audio clips taken from the 1970’s theme song for The Road Runner Show, as well as a Warner Bros. cartoon called Stop! Look! and Hasten! The clips were rearranged to sit nicely against the dialogue, as well as offer ironic counterpoint — as in the melody that accompanies Wendy’s final line in the apartment scene: “Well, let’s just wait and see. We’re all gonna have a real good time…”

The editing room for the documentary, The Making of The Shining, which was directed by Stanley Kubrick’s 17-year-old daughter, Vivian.

Lining a shelf on the wall are Betamax video transfers of the over fifty hours of footage that Vivian shot during the production. These videotapes, as well as her original negative, are housed in the Stanley Kubrick Archive in London. They are not currently accessible by the public.

The typewriter that Vivian used during her work is the same prop Adler typewriter used by Jack Nicholson in the film.

Vivian Kubrick, daughter of Stanley Kubrick, in the editing room of her documentary on the making of The Shining.

Vivian Kubrick, daughter of Stanley Kubrick, in the editing room of her documentary on the making of The Shining.