Ephemera related to Stanley Kubrick's Masterpiece of Modern Horror, 'The Shining'
Actor Jack Nicholson on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.

Standing near the camera is Stanley Kubrick’s assistant Leon Vitali.

In the foreground, the video assist system can be seen. The Shining was one of the first productions to make use of on-set video playback for immediate review of what was being shot.

(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Actor Jack Nicholson on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.

Standing near the camera is Stanley Kubrick’s assistant Leon Vitali.

In the foreground, the video assist system can be seen. The Shining was one of the first productions to make use of on-set video playback for immediate review of what was being shot.

(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Actor Jack Nicholson and Continuity Supervisor June Randall on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.
(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Actor Jack Nicholson and Continuity Supervisor June Randall on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.

(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Actor Scatman Crothers on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.
(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was actor Jack Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Actor Scatman Crothers on the Colorado Lounge set of The Shining.

(Photo courtesy Kathleen Dolan, who was actor Jack Nicholson’s assistant during production.)

Set of lobby cards from the French theatrical release of The Shining.

None of these images are taken from the finished film. They are all frames from alternate, unused takes.

In Vivian Kubrick’s documentary on the making of The Shining, several crew members can be seen wearing a black sweater with “The Shining" in red letters, and a white hawk hovering above the text. The hawk is a nod to Stanley Kubrick’s production company, "Hawk Films Ltd."

These custom sweaters were given as gifts by actor Jack Nicholson to everyone on the crew during the production. 

Cover art for a fictitious Criterion release of The Shining.
Artist: Gary E. Irwin

Cover art for a fictitious Criterion release of The Shining.

Artist: Gary E. Irwin

Syndicated newspaper column written about three weeks after The Shining opened in the U.S.
Like most of Stanley Kubrick’s films, the initial critical reaction was very mixed. While the film had its proponents, most of the reviews derided the film for being banal, slow, and too loosely adapted from Stephen King’s novel.
While opinions still vary on the film, and debate still rages about the relative merits of the book versus the film, The Shining has cemented a place for itself among the classics of modern cinema, and is still being talked about nearly thirty-five years after its release.

Syndicated newspaper column written about three weeks after The Shining opened in the U.S.

Like most of Stanley Kubrick’s films, the initial critical reaction was very mixed. While the film had its proponents, most of the reviews derided the film for being banal, slow, and too loosely adapted from Stephen King’s novel.

While opinions still vary on the film, and debate still rages about the relative merits of the book versus the film, The Shining has cemented a place for itself among the classics of modern cinema, and is still being talked about nearly thirty-five years after its release.

Winter coat wardrobe from The Shining, worn by actor Scatman Crothers during the shots where he lies dead in a pool of blood.

The coat was sold to a crew member after production. He took it home to his mother, who washed out the stage blood and sewed up the gash. He wore it for a number of years before offering it up as a piece of movie memorabilia.

The coat is currently in the collection of The Caretaker.

'The Overlook maze is the only maze to be planted this century. It consists of over a mile and a half of pathways and can take up to 90 minutes to find your way out from the center. However, there is a system by which you can more easily find your way out. Whenever you come to a new junction, take any path you like. Whenever you come by a new path to an old junction, turn back. But, whenever you come by an old path to a new junction, take a new path.'

Instructions for using the Overlook Hotel’s Hedge Maze. Wendy read these instructions to Danny in a scene that was filmed, but not used in the final version of The Shining.

When Danny first ventures into Room 237, a painting can be seen reflected in a mirrored door just inside the room. The painting is titled “Boy, Dog And St. John River” (1958) by Canadian artist Alex Colville.

Colville’s paintings are often described as having a subtly unsettling quality, which is perhaps why Kubrick chose to feature them in The Shining.

Colville died in 2013 at the age of 92. After his passing, his son, Graham, remarked:

“I must say, I (felt) slight surprise when I saw Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining and I suddenly realized my father’s paintings were in the background in numerous scenes. They were implanted in that film as almost subliminal messages.“

Two other Colville paintings can be seen at the beginning of the film hanging in the family’s Boulder apartment, and yet another can be seen at the Overlook, near the end of the film.