Ephemera related to Stanley Kubrick's Masterpiece of Modern Horror, 'The Shining'
Actor Jack Nicholson reading between takes on the set of The Shining.

Actor Jack Nicholson reading between takes on the set of The Shining.

REDRUM - The Unauthorized Musical Parody of The Shining

CNN piece about how The Shining has continued to fascinate movie-goers for well over three decades.

Features sculptures by artist Howard Senft.

The Shining, re-imagined as an 8-bit video game.

Artist: David Dutton

Dan Lloyd has given another interview about his time working on The Shining, this time to the New York Daily News

In it, Lloyd addresses the longtime rumor that he hated the experience of making the film, and that it had somehow ruined his life and made him no longer want to act. In truth, he explains, he tried to continue an acting career, without success, finally giving up when he was fourteen.

He recalls eating lots of peanut butter sandwiches between takes, as well as playing with Lisa and Louise Burns, the young actresses who played the creepy Grady Twins.

He also recalls a time he stumbled onto the set when Jack Nicholson was in maniacal axe-wielding mode. When Nicholson saw young Danny, he immediately became goofy, hopping around and wielding the axe like a tomahawk.

Dan Lloyd, who played young Danny Torrance, was recently interviewed by The Sun regarding his experience working on The Shining.
He discusses fond memories of filming in 1978, and that he didn’t know he was in a scary film. The film was shot out of order, and he was shielded from any frightening or bloody imagery. To the five-year-old, it was all fun and games and an opportunity to ride a tricycle around indoors.
Dan was shown a severely cut down version of the film when he was young, and didn’t see the complete film until he was sixteen, when some friends rented it from a video store.
Lloyd, who is now forty and teaching Biology in rural Kentucky, was asked about what his own three children think of the film. He said they mostly just make fun of his haircut.

Dan Lloyd, who played young Danny Torrance, was recently interviewed by The Sun regarding his experience working on The Shining.

He discusses fond memories of filming in 1978, and that he didn’t know he was in a scary film. The film was shot out of order, and he was shielded from any frightening or bloody imagery. To the five-year-old, it was all fun and games and an opportunity to ride a tricycle around indoors.

Dan was shown a severely cut down version of the film when he was young, and didn’t see the complete film until he was sixteen, when some friends rented it from a video store.

Lloyd, who is now forty and teaching Biology in rural Kentucky, was asked about what his own three children think of the film. He said they mostly just make fun of his haircut.

Video frame grab from the German-language version of The Shining.
Instead of “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” Kubrick used “Was du heute kannst besorgen, das verschiebe nicht auf morgen,” which translates to “Never put off til tomorrow what may be done today.”
Kubrick shot additional versions of the typewriter inserts for use in various countries.

Video frame grab from the German-language version of The Shining.

Instead of “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” Kubrick used “Was du heute kannst besorgen, das verschiebe nicht auf morgen,” which translates to “Never put off til tomorrow what may be done today.”

Kubrick shot additional versions of the typewriter inserts for use in various countries.

Filming Shelley Duvall on the Kitchen set of The Shining. This image, from Vivian Kubrick’s documentary on the making of The Shining, captures the exact take which Stanley Kubrick used in the finished film.